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Source: Photo by Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images

Serena Williams Breaks Her Silence About Controversial U.S. Open Final In New Interview

By Dana Levinson

Serena Williams still stands by her assertion that she received no coaching from the sidelines during her Grand Slam match against Naomi Osaka at the U.S. Open. The controversy erupted when the referee penalized Williams for the alleged infraction. The situation escalated, and Serena broke her racket, and talked back to the referee, which garnered further penalties.

In the aftermath of the controversy, Serena's coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, told ESPN...

"I'm honest, I was coaching. I don't think she looked at me so that's why she didn't even think I was. But I was, like 100 per cent of the coaches in 100 per cent of the matches so we have to stop this hypocritical thing. Sascha [Bajin, Osaka's coach] was coaching every point, too. It's strange that this chair umpire [Carlos Ramos] was the chair umpire of most of the finals of Rafa [Nadal] and [his uncle] Toni's coaching every single point and he never gave a warning so I don't really get it."

But, speaking out for the first time since the match itself, Serena responded....

"We have never discussed signals. I don't even call for on-court coaching. I'm trying to figure out why he would say that. I don't understand. I mean, maybe he said, 'You can do it.' I was on the far other end, so I'm not sure. I want to clarify myself what he's talking about."

Williams lost the match to Naomi Osaka, racking up $17,000 in fines in the process. After all was said and done, she explained she felt that the way she was treated was sexist, saying that male players do exactly what she was accused of without half the penalty.

Olympic gold medalist and soccer player Abby Wambach agreed...

"She’s the best in the world, so she’s going to get scrutinized the most; she’s a woman of color; she’s a woman; [and] she’s just coming back from having a baby."

She went on...

"She is a literal walking, breathing science experiment at how the world relates to people that are perceived as less than or marginalized. What Serena got herself into, and what the world has witnessed, and what this guy, this umpire, has put out into the universe was just a microcosm of what’s been happening in our culture."

Many understood where Serena was coming from...