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Source: Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

Viola Davis Explains Why She Regrets Accepting Her Oscar-Nominated Role In 'The Help'

By Dana Levinson

Viola Davis had been a theatre mainstay for decades before she burst into national consciousness with her role as Mrs. Miller in the 2008 film Doubt, based on the play of the same name. Her performance in the Meryl Streep vehicle earned her an Oscar nomination. Soon after that, she found herself starring on Broadway opposite Denzel Washington in Fences. And only one year later, was starring as Aibileen Clark in The Help, for which she was nominated at the Oscars for Best Leading Actress. To date, Davis now has an Oscar under her belt for the film version of Fences, as well as a SAG Award, a BAFTA, a Golden Globe, and a Critic's Choice Award, plus an Emmy to boot for her role as Annalise Keating in the ABC drama How To Get Away With Murder.

Davis is a prime example of the fact that behind every perceived meteoric rise was years of hard work and dedication, slowly climbing the ladder one rung at a time. While Doubt was her breakout, The Help was, in many ways, her launch to national consciousness. But with her new found success also comes a newfound perspective. In an interview with the New York Times about her new film Widow, Davis was asked if she regrets any roles she's ever done, and as it turns out, she regrets appearing in The Help.

She responded...

"I just felt that at the end of the day that it wasn’t the voices of the maids that were heard. I know Aibileen. I know Minny. They’re my grandma. They’re my mom. And I know that if you do a movie where the whole premise is, 'I want to know what it feels like to work for white people and to bring up children in 1963, I want to hear how you really feel about it,' I never heard that in the course of the movie."

However, there were still things she appreciated about the experience...

"The friendships that I formed [working on The Help] are ones that I’m going to have for the rest of my life. I had a great experience with these other actresses, who are extraordinary human beings. And I could not ask for a better collaborator than Tate Taylor." 

She has a point. The film, based on the Kathryn Stockett novel of the same name, centered Skeeter Phelan, a young white woman played by Emma Stone who was working on a book about black maids over the black maids that the film purported to be telling a story about. The movie was much more about Phelan's education as a white woman finally taking notice of the everyday prejudice and racism around her than it was about the women with whom she was forging relationships, in particular Davis' Aibileen.