Your browser may block some cookies by default. By clicking, you agree to allow our advertising partners to place their cookies and serve you more relevant ads. Visit our privacy policy page to view our privacy policy or opt-out.
BidenGuac-1509687274413-1509687278789.jpg
Source: Marc Nozel/Flickr

Joe Biden Decries Trump As A 'Charlatan' During Speech, And We're Screaming Inside

By Dennis Matthew Livesey

Former Vice President Joe Biden is something of an enigma. After deciding not run in 2016, Biden still chose to remain a public face of the Democratic party. Today Biden walks like a candidate, talks like a candidate, and rumors abound about his potential as a candidate in 2020.

Recent news may shed some light on why Biden bowed out in 2016.

Donna Brazile, former interim chair of the Democratic National Committee, revealed earlier this week that Hillary Clinton had taken de facto leadership of the DNC a year before her official nomination, effectively eliminating all competition. Whether or not Biden still has political aspirations is yet to be seen, but he remains an important voice for the Democratic party, which is still recovering from the 2016 election. While many still wonder what's next for Biden, he seems to be focused on what's next for the country, especially under the leadership of President Donald Trump.

In a speech to the Chicago Council on Global Affairs this week, Biden said:

Today I worry we’re walking down a very dark path, [a] path that isolates the United States on the world stage, endangers the American people and, with other international events taking place that are tearing at the fabric of a liberal world order, it’s even more dangerous.
There’s a lot of people out there scared to death with good reason. They come from my old neighborhood. They’re not stupid. They have real fears.
These people aren’t prejudiced. They’re realistic. And then they become the targets for charlatans. Look what happens. Like most charlatans throughout time, you see them aggrandize themselves and consolidate their power by blaming the ‘other.’