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Source: @gogetglitter (Instagram)

Glitter Pumpkin Butts Are The Newest Instagram Trend That We Can't Unsee 😱

By B. Miller

Halloween is quickly approaching, and would the holiday be complete without some sort of NSFW costume trend?

Halloween didn't always involve sexy costumes. In fact, costumes weren't even a part of the equation until the 19th century. First, Halloween was a religious celebration called All Hallow's Eve. During All Hallow's Eve, people would pray for the dead as well as things like fertile marriages. During the Victorian era, the holiday began to stray from its religious confines and the secular holiday that we now know began to develop.

Author and Halloween expert Lesley Bannatyne explained that Victorians became enamored with the holiday after Robert Burns' 1785 poem "Halloween" and they began to dress up in costumes. The primary choices were more on the creepy side of things, but some would choose more "exotic" options like an Egyptian princess.

Bannatyne explained:

It wouldn't have shown much skin, but it would have had the aura of being outside the box. It was seen as glamorous and kind of in the same vein as you see kids shopping for sexy costumes today β€” in some part of their minds they think it's glamorous. 'A night to do something that I wouldn't ordinarily do and have people look at me.'

Costumes continued to gain popularity in relation to Halloween, and the 1920s saw paper costumes worn over clothing. After World War II, the holiday began to revolve more around children and the tradition of trick-or-treating.

Then, in the 1970s, sexiness entered the picture. 

Bannatyne explained the emergence of the "sexy" Halloween costume:

There started to be these outrageous gay Halloween parades in the Castro District, Greenwich Village and Key West. Combine second-wave feminism with outrageousness and a general atmosphere of freedom, and you have this perfect storm of more outrageous costumes.