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Source: TORU YAMANAKA/Getty Images

Japanese Water Drop Cake Disappears If You Don't Eat It Quickly Enough—And We Want One

By Collin Gossel

In Japan's southern Alps, there's a special kind of cake which doesn't look much at all like what we eat on our birthdays. 

The cake is called Mizu Shingen mochi, or raindrop cake, and it's not hard to see why:

If a passerby didn't know better, they'd think it was just a giant drop of water, but the raindrop cake is solid...at least for 30 minutes. Once it's been exposed to room temperature, customers have about 30 minutes to eat the cake before it loses its shape.