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Swallowing Liquid Nitrogen Is The Internet's Newest 'Trend'--It's Also Extremely Dangerous

Swallowing Liquid Nitrogen Is The Internet's Newest 'Trend'--It's Also Extremely Dangerous
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2 weeks ago

Instagrammable desserts are popping up every day now. We've seen ice cream rolls, cereal milk soft serve topped with more cereal, and more. One of the most recent sugar-coated trends? Dragon's Breath.

The cold dessert comes as a cup of cereal puffs coated in liquid nitrogen, and tastes like Fruit Loops. 

You crunch on the cold cereal, and blow out smoke like a dragon:

#pensacolainterstatefair #Dragonbreath

A post shared by Jacoby Sevenfold Allison (@jacobysevenfold) on

This might sound cool, but the potential damage it can do sure isn't. Health officials said that this type of dessert could melt the inside of your mouth, and your internal organs. On top of that, the cold treat can cause frostbite, damage to the skin, and even asphyxiation, a.k.a. being deprived of oxygen, which can be fatal. 

Suffolk County Commissioner of Health Services James Tomarken warned against the dangerous dessert:

"Instances of frostbite and tissue damage have been reported when residual liquid nitrogen is left in the serving cup. If fingers are used to remove the product from the cup, skin contact with liquid nitrogen can cause frostbite."

Liquid nitrogen can cause some serious damage someones skin – and it has. Back in 2017, a 14-year-old acquired a severe chemical burn after touching one of the liquid nitrogen-coated cereal puffs. She was rushed to the emergency room, where someone sliced the dead skin and removed the infection. Doctors told her grandmother that the girl could have lost her thumb. 

Her grandmother reported that her nephew also felt side effects of the puffs. He claimed that one side of his mouth was burnt and his tongue froze, leaving him unable to feel it for the rest of the night.

Despite these concerns, teens continue to indulge in the dessert and share snaps exhaling the liquid nitrogen:

These puffs can be as cold as negative 320 degrees, and can pose a number of hazards when the liquid isn't completely removed from the cup.

Tomarken pointed out that even when prepared safely, this deadly dessert can do some real damage:

"Ingestion of liquid nitrogen can cause severe damage to the mouth, esophagus, and stomach. Preparing the puffs in a manner that removes residual liquid nitrogen prior to serving effectively reduces the potential for injury."

Dragon's Breath is accessible and a growing trend, being sold at state fairs, on boardwalks, and in shopping malls:

Do it for the 'gram...except when the trend might be fatal. No dessert is worth a trip to the emergency room, permanent damage to internal organs, losing a thumb, or even death. Let us all stick with rolled ice cream and bubble teas, ok?

H / T - NYPost, WearTV, Today